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Faces & Places of Yesterday

Photos of yesterday, featuring regular people and regular places.

Oldsmobile Crossing Boulder Bridge in 1920

Check out this terrific high resolution photo from 1920. It shows an Oldsmobile just after crossing Boulder Bridge on Beach Drive. Source: Library of Congress

Photo of Lower Georgia Avenue in 1870s

Here’s a great photo that we found on Park View DC. Of course it wasn’t called Georgia Avenue then, so read up on the history of the road too. Check out their post to...
boarding houses in Washington (1940)

Help Identify These Boarding Houses (c. 1940)

GoDCers, we need your help. Where is this? The photo was sent in by Ben this week and we’d love to help him identify the location. I’m guessing that there’s a fifty percent chance...
Healy Hall in 1940

Healy Hall in Brick? … Nevermind

Is this right? We need your help. We’re doing a little pre-posting for the next week and came across this fascinating photo. It appears to be Healy Hall at Georgetown, but it looks like...
Wisconsin Avenue, NW, south of O Street at "rush hour" (June 30, 1960).

“Rush Hour” on Wisconsin Near O Street in 1960

Not exactly rush hour. But, it looks pretty similar to today, minus the streetcar tracks of course. Source: DDOTDC
Scott Circle, NW, looking northeast from Rhode Island Avenue with statue of Gen. Winfield Scott; note glass street sign under globe. (July 8, 1950

Scott Circle in the 1950s

Here’s a cool photo that we found on Flickr. Source: DDOTDC Flickr
1940s DC rowhouse

Color Photo of Rowhouse in the 1940s

Wow, this is beautiful. Any idea where this house is? This looks like it could be Dupont, or maybe Columbia Heights? Source: vintage everyday UPDATE: A reader tweeted the following. @GhostsofDC @UrbanTurf_DC looks like Hillyer...
At 3rd & H Streets, NE, a streetcar passes an unpaved sidewalk and no-longer existing wall, September 1947

What H Street Looked Like in 1947

Very different than today … this is what H St. NE looked like a couple of years after World War II. Source: DDOTDC Flickr
The clean-cut collegiate looks of these two young peace activists do not fit the common stereotype of the long-haired radicals and "peaceniks" who protested against the escalating war in Southeast Asia. They were joined by several hundred thousand anti-war protestors who descended upon the nation's capitol to dissent against what they believed was an immoral war.

I Won’t Fight in Vietnam (1965)

Here’s a photo we came across on Pinterest user Estella Gonzales’ pinboard. Several hundred thousand people had descended on Washington to protest our involvement in the escalating Vietnam War. Source: Penn State Special Collections