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Cleveland Park

Reno Rd. NW

Reno Road Almost Renamed Washington Avenue

A little-known story about upper northwest is that Reno Road, which cuts right through the heart of North Cleveland Park to Chevy Chase, was almost renamed Washington Avenue, in honor of the west coast...

Before 2Amys on Macomb Street

This isn’t a full “If Walls Could Talk” post since we couldn’t find a ton of information on 3715 & 3713 Macomb St. NW. But, since I was having pizza there (again) with my...
Cleveland Heights - 1889

1889 Cleveland Park Real Estate Ad

At the time, Grover Cleveland lived north of the city in a lovely old estate called Oak Hill. Eventually, the neighborhood that grew up around his home was named for him: "Cleveland Park".
Oak View - home of President Cleveland - Oct. 3, 1897

Why Is It Named Cleveland Park?

What is today Cleveland Park was an area for well-off Washingtonians to build their summer cottages. It was far enough away from swampy hot downtown and elevated to provide some breezy relief.
Connecticut Avenue Highlands advertisement in 1910

1910 Ad for Connecticut Ave. Highlands (Cleveland Park)

Here’s a cool old advertisement for Connecticut Avenue Highlands, now known as Cleveland Park. Click on the ad for a larger version to read the details. Source: Library of Congress Check out more of...
Phoebe Hearst Elementary School

Why Is It Named Hearst Elementary School?

Hearst Elementary School up in North Cleveland Park, behind Sidwell Friends, is a cute little school for about 200 students. We’ve wanted to do a post on a local public school for a while...

Desirable Villas in Cleveland Heights

You may or may not be aware of this, but in the early days, Cleveland Park was referred to as Cleveland Heights (i.e., Columbia Heights, and Adams Morgan formerly known as Washington Heights). Below...
Washington Post - August 5th, 1928

36th and Veazey, North Cleveland Park Advertisement (1928)

Here’s an old ad from the roaring 20s.
3033 Ordway St. NW

First Time Offered: 3033 Ordway Street NW at $32,500

Sigh. How does looking at this advertisement make you feel? This was printed on Leap Day, February 29th, 1948. Source: Washington Post