Here’s a photo we came across on Pinterest user Estella Gonzales’ pinboard.

Several hundred thousand people had descended on Washington to protest our involvement in the escalating Vietnam War.

The clean-cut collegiate looks of these two young peace activists do not fit the common stereotype of the long-haired radicals and "peaceniks" who protested against the escalating war in Southeast Asia. They were joined by several hundred thousand anti-war protestors who descended upon the nation's capitol to dissent against what they believed was an immoral war.
The clean-cut collegiate looks of these two young peace activists do not fit the common stereotype of the long-haired radicals and “peaceniks” who protested against the escalating war in Southeast Asia. They were joined by several hundred thousand anti-war protestors who descended upon the nation’s capitol to dissent against what they believed was an immoral war.

Source: Penn State Special Collections

 

More from Ghosts of DC

downtown Washington at F St. in 1942

D.C. Subway is Predicted in 1941

Here is a fascinating article we dug up in the Washington Post from April 8th, 1941. At the time, only Boston, New York and Philadelphia

Map of Thomas Circle in 1888

This is cool. It’s the Sanborn Fire Insurance Map of the area around Thomas Circle in 1888. The yellow buildings are wooden frame structures and

Anacostia and Good Hope Road in 1916

Good Hope Road in 1916

Take a look at how different Good Hope Road in Anacostia looked in 1916. And below is the Google Map of the same area, with

Picture of Washington (1840)

Making Sense of D.C. Taxes in 1840

I’m reading a very interesting book about Washington published in 1840 titled “A Picture of Washington.” I just got to the part where it starts