A Regular Friday Morning 50 Years Ago

Everyone else is going to be covering the 50th anniversary of Kennedy’s assassination and there will be no shortage of stories about it. Here at Ghosts of DC, we want to shed some light on the other things that happened that day … the regular, average stuff. Throughout the day, we’re going to highlight some normal things from the day, starting with the front page of the Washington Post on Friday, November 22nd, 1963. Click on the image for a larger version.

front page of the Washington Post on November 22nd, 1963
front page of the Washington Post on November 22nd, 1963

And, of course, here is what the front page looked like on Saturday morning.

front page of the Washington Post - November 23rd, 1963
front page of the Washington Post on November 23rd, 1963

 

 

More from Ghosts of DC

Washington, D.C., 1923. "City houses." One in a series of Harris & Ewing plates documenting the national capital's poorer quarters.

Run Down Old Home in 1923

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West-southwest view with Maryland Ave. SW and B Street SW

1863 View Down Maryland Ave.

Wow, check out this amazing view. We dug up this gem on the Library of Congress site. The full caption is below. West-southwest view with

Picture of Washington (1840)

Making Sense of D.C. Taxes in 1840

I’m reading a very interesting book about Washington published in 1840 titled “A Picture of Washington.” I just got to the part where it starts

Anacostia and Good Hope Road in 1916

Good Hope Road in 1916

Take a look at how different Good Hope Road in Anacostia looked in 1916. And below is the Google Map of the same area, with

Walter & Hazel Johnson in 1924 (Library of Congress)

Walter Johnson Was a Suffragist

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the women’s suffrage parade in Washington. Give the historical importance of that, and the fact that today is

policeman having coffee

Policeman Loves His Coffee

This is an interesting photograph from the 1920s. A policeman is chatting with the driver of a car and he appears to have a young