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Faces & Places of Yesterday

Photos of yesterday, featuring regular people and regular places.

Shoppers at the outdoor food market, 7th Street at Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C. View looking up 7th Street, ca. 1900

Shoppers on Pennsylvania Ave. (1900)

Here’s a great photo to share on a lazy Saturday.

Christ Church in Alexandria During the Civil War

The next time you’re cruising around Alexandria, you need to swing by Christ Church. I hate to admit it, but prior to this photograph, I was not familiar with the church. Now, I will...
Looking southwest at the Old Post Office Pavilion (far left), Southern Railway Building (middle), and District Building on Pennsylvania Avenue NW in Washington, D.C., in 1932. On in the fall of 1932, the structures in rear of the District Building would be razed to make way for the U.S. Department of Labor building, whose cornerstone would be laid on December 15, 1932

View from the Willard Hotel’s Roof

Wow. I think this photo speaks for itself. What an amazing shot of what would become Federal Triangle.

Merry Christmas From the Secretary of the Navy (1922)

The family below is celebrating, what appears to be, a very formal Christmas. Look how stiff the father is … he happens to be Edwin Denby, Secretary of the Navy. The 10-year-old boy in...
Washington circa 1916. "Fairview Hotel, 1st Street and Florida Avenue." The proprietor is former slave and "colored philosopher" Keith Sutherland. See the comments below for more on him. Harris & Ewing glass negative.

Ex-King of Hell’s Bottom

“Keitt” Sutherland is definitely one of the top characters we have come across. And, I think it’s safe to say, Officer Sprinkle must have come across some of the ruffians from Hell’s Bottom in...
Old man selling strawberries on the street - 1900

Old Man Selling Strawberries on the Street

What a great photograph. We came across this one on Flickr.
Lafayette Park seen from the Old Executive Office Building in 1919 (RU007355 - Martin A. Gruber Photograph Collection, 1919-1924, Smithsonian Institution Archives )

The White House Gates Are Open to All

This is an odd scene, and one you would not see today. Below you’ll see a photo of Lafayette Square, taken from the Old Executive Office Building. The gates you see swung open are...
Washington, D.C., 1920. "Gripp, Mathew, [Nathan] Lahn, Troske -- Gallaudet U." Gridiron stars of the first college for the deaf, credited with inventing the football huddle in the 1920s as a way to keep its signed plays secret.

Gallaudet Football Invents the Huddle

According to legend, the Gallaudet football team invented the huddle as a means to prevent opposing teams from stealing their plays by reading their sign language. Below are four players from the 1920 Gallaudet...
September 1935. A closeup of the Washington, D.C., row house seen here over the weekend. "Front of old brick structure in section near Union Station. Land is low here and water collects in front and backyard after a rain and remains for many days. Entrances to privies are usually under water. Interior of homes similar in shabbiness to exterior." 35mm nitrate negative by Carl Mydans for the Resettlement Administration.

Children of Poverty Near Union Station

Here’s a great photo from Shorpy. This shows a row of houses on Massachusetts Ave. near Union Station in 1935. And here is the photo of the the kids again, this time up close.