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Category: Guest Posts

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"Full size mockup of partial Metro station 1968" from Harry Weese Associates' 1994 book describing Metro's early plans.

Metro’s 17-Foot Long “Experimental Station” in 1968

WMATA spent $69,000 for the sample station in May 1968.  After just a few weeks of construction, it measured 64 feet in width, 30 feet in height, and just 17 feet in length.  It marked a key milestone in the capital subway project – a massive planning and engineering effort that started in the 1950s.

A Brief History of Brunch in D.C.

What is the history of brunch in Washington? The word dates back to 1895 and started appearing the the local papers in the early 20th century. Are you hungry?

It’s 4:20 Somewhere

Hazy blue smoke surrounds the origins of the annual Fourth of July Smoke-In. Though it now takes place in Lafayette Square, across the barricaded street from the White House, it began on the Mall.

The Women’s Suffrage Parade of 1913

This is a guest post by Angela Harrison Eng. March 3, 2013, was an important day in women’s history, yet it went virtually unnoticed in the public eye. Before women gained the right to vote nationwide in 1920, the efforts

The Little Green House on K Street

This is a guest post by Angela Harrison Eng  At a first glance, there is nothing monumental about 1625 K Street NW. A bland building occupies the space, along with several nondescript businesses and a parking garage. However, on this

The Pennsylvania Avenue Childs around 1917

Before Fast Food, There Was Childs’ Food

This is a guest post by Angela Harrison Eng Before the modern fast food restaurant, there was Childs Restaurant. Childs was a chain that originated in New York City and spread southward, eventually opening franchises in Washington, DC. Though DC

Exterior of the Knickerbocker on opening day, 1917

The Knickerbocker Theatre Collapse

This is a guest post by Angela Harrison Eng Winter storms like hurricanes are regularly named every year. This naming practice, however, was not always the norm. One snowstorm that hit DC in 1922 was named “The Knickerbocker Storm” (see

D.C.’s Connection With the Titanic

This is a guest post by Angela Harrison Eng. New York has significant ties to Titanic. Many of Gotham’s elite members of society died in the disaster, including John Jacob Astor, Benjamin Guggenheim, and Isidor and Ida Straus. However, DC

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