Notable People & Places / 02.02.2012

This might be the most unique ideas for a post that I have come up with thus far. Hopefully you will agree and enjoy reading it.
I love Hawaii (who doesn't?) and over the years I've been fortunate enough to spend a number of vacations in the islands with family. I'm quite fond of the place and have some great memories from my visits. Being the history nerd that I am, I'm intrigued by their unique past, especially the more recent history of the islands, from the original western name of the "Sandwich Islands", to unification under King Kamehameha, to the overthrow under Queen Liliʻuokalani. Hawaii has a fascinating history, and it's one that has a unique and, in my mind, a fascinating connection with Washington, D.C. During the 1890s, the islands saw major upheaval, coups and battling interests for control over the precious resources of the island. The woman charged with protecting the interests of her people and her island nation Lydia Kamakaʻeha Pākī, formally known as Queen Liliʻuokalani, the last monarch of Hawaii. We all know that, in the end, Queen Liliʻuokalani was unable to maintain Hawaiian sovereignty. Hawaii was eventually annexed by the United States under the McKinley Administration and became our 50th state about 60 years later. What most people likely do not know is that she made a well-publicized trip to the mainland -- using a passport from the Republic of Hawaii -- to make one last effort at maintaining Hawaiian self-determination. This post is about her time in the our city.