Bystanders Whipped the Brutal Fellow (1892)

I’m doing a little early morning research and this one from January 11th, 1892 caught my eye.

Frank Rowler, a messenger boy, was assaulted in Crowley’s oyster house, on the Avenue, late Saturday night, by a man named Howard, who was in an ugly temper from drink. Several bystanders interfered, among whom was Michael McDonald. Mr. McDonald was so angry that a man should strike a little boy that he hit Howard a terrible blow, cutting him badly under the eye. Officer Hodges arrested Howard and took him to the First precinct, where he was charged with assault. Howard was pretty badly used up, and claimed to have been kicked after being knocked down.

So much for being a good samaritan. It sounds like McDonald took it a little too far, basically beating the crap out of the drunken Howard.

I keep coming across articles like this, which really paint a picture of a rougher town in a rougher time, but the weapon of choice then was your fists, not guns.

 

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