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Tag: World War I

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Major General Peter C. Haines, Retired

Hains Point: How Did It Get Its Name?

Hains point is named for Peter Conover Hains, a prominent Major General in the U.S. Army and served in the Civil War, Spanish-American War and World War I.

John Henry Balch, Corpsman, U.S. Navy, visiting Washington, D.C., in June 1917 [at Columbus statue at Union Station], while awaiting shipment overseas. The Marine on the right is not identified. [Portraits.] [Scene, World War I, World War 1.] John Henry Balch. 06/1917; NH 80571; Courtesy of Commander J.H. Balch, U.S. Navy (retired), 1974.

Two World War I Marines in Front of Union Station

Here’s another great photo send in by GoDCer Michael. These two marines are sitting in front of Union Station, on the Columbus Statue as they await getting shipped out for World War I.

Panoramic Photos of Camp Meigs in 1918

What a great old photo from World War I. These photos show Camp Meigs in 1918. Source: U.S. National Archives Source: Library of Congress

soldiers rolling through Washington on trucks

World War I Soldier Ogling Woman

Here’s our next photo for “Pictures Tell a Story.” It’s a great old shot from 1918 of World War I soldiers motoring through the city on trucks. Source: Library of Congress So, to start, let’s look at the soldiers in the last truck. Notice how he’s staring at the woman crossing the street. He might […]

Washington Times - July 28th, 1914

July 28th, 1914: Austria Has Chosen War

This is the front page of the Washington Times from Tuesday evening, July 28th, 1914, the day Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia. Source: Library of Congress

Washington, D.C., circa 1918. "Robert Hall, group." in color

1918 in Color: Be Prepared

Shorpy always has great photos. You can spent way too much time digging through finding gems like this. The photo below is a scene replicating Joseph Leyendecker’s BSA Liberty Loan poster for bonds during World War I. Gotta love these colorized photos, though it’s not as good as the Lincoln or Lindbergh photos. Check out the […]

1919. "U.S. Army. Return of Washington, D.C., soldiers." Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative.

Soldier Returns Home From World War I

Here’s a powerful photo. The soldier looks absolutely thrilled to be back and hold, what appears to be, his baby. The baby, on the other hand, not so thrilled to be handled.

French assault Germans in trench warfare

This Day in History: The Great War Delays D.C. School Opening

This is an interesting article from the Washington Times, dated August 8th, 1914, exactly 98 years ago today. World War I (i.e., the Great War) had been going for roughly two weeks and the paper reported the impact it would have on the local schools. Many school teachers were spending their summers in Europe when […]

Five-Year-Old Arrested for Getting His Kite Out of Tree

This is an odd story from the Washington Times. The paper reported on August 11th, 1908 the arrest of a young five-year-old. Yes, a little kid was arrested and it’s a bizarre story. Not only was he taken in by the police, but they had to do so in front of the young boys dog. […]

Lusitania sinking off the coast of Ireland (Ken Marschall)

1915 Lusitania Advertisement in Washington Post

This is another haunting discover, much like the advertisement I uncovered for the Titanic (also, read about the notable DC resident that went down with that ship). I came across an advertisement in the Washington Post on April 25th, 1915 — exactly 97 years ago today (a good “This Day in History” post) — for […]

Capitol Building after World War I Armistace Day (DC Public Library Commons)

Washington Goes Wild to Celebrate Armistice Signing (1918)

Here’s an excellent photo from the DC Public Library Flickr photostream. This shows the Capitol Building fully lit up following announcement of the end of World War I. The end of the Great War has lost its luster in place of the end of the Second World War … but it was an equally, if […]

Walter Reed Army Hospital flu ward circa 1919 (Shorpy)

Children Across D.C. Left Orphaned by Spanish Flu

I was researching a couple of stories and I came across an article that was so sad that I had to share it with you. It’s from the Washington Times on October 19th, 1918. The world was in the middle of the greatest pandemic in the history of the planet. Between 50 and 100 million people […]

Front page of Washington Times on March 10th, 1919

A World War I Hero: First American Dog to Enter German Territory

I’m a dog lover. I’m a huge dog lover and so is my wife (Marley and Me was a difficult movie to watch). When I came across this front page headline in the Washington Times, I was both saddened and moved. This poor dog — her name was Sergeant Helen Kaiser — was both brave […]

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