Ethel Roosevelt’s Dog Goes Missing From The White House

This article that we came across in the Washington Post is probably something we would never see today. I’m pretty sure Bo Obama is pretty locked down and confined to the White House grounds. This was not the case for the Roosevelt dog in 1909. This article from February 6th of that year tells the story.

There was consternation at the White House yesterday morning, when it was discovered that Ace, the favorite bull pup belonging to Miss Ethel Roosevelt, was missing. Small scouting parties of the White House employes scurried about searching diligently for the lost pet and recalling that it was not the first time Ace had fled from the executive mansion. On several previous occasions, after mingling democratically with other canines for several hours in the streets, Ace has returned to the comparative seclusion of the executive grounds.

Here is a description of the dog given in an advertisement sent from the White House:

“Lost–Bull pup; name Ace; lemon and white, clear and distinct white diamond on right hip. No collar. Reward if returned to the White House.”

The dog is about a year old, and has been in Miss Roosevelt’s possession since last summer. He was named Ace because of the white diamond-shaped mark on his hip, which is his distinguishing characteristic. While playing around the White House grounds he has been allowed to go without his collar, but when he accompanies Miss Roosevelt on rides and strolls he always is in canine full dress.

Ace is not related in any way to Pete, the White House bulldog who gained notoriety by treeing the French ambassador and forcing Secretary Garfield to approach the White house by an indirect route. White House employes say the missing pet has a friendly disposition which has endeared him to large numbers of acquaintances, and they believe he will be recognized and brought home.

The police also were asked to look for Ace, and his description sent to all the precincts.

You’ll be happy to know that Ace was eventually found and returned to the Roosevelt family … an outcome far better than what happened to LBJ’s dog.

Ethel Roosevelt in 1908 (Library of Congress)
Ethel Roosevelt in 1908 (Library of Congress)

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