Before the Hay-Adams Hotel

This is what stood on the corner of 16th and H St. before the iconic Hay-Adams Hotel. this was the home of former Secretary of State John Hay, who was also a private secretary and assistant to Abraham Lincoln (check out this amazing colorized photo of him).

- click image for more -
View of house at 800 16th Street NW once occupied by Secretary of State John Hay (1898-1905).
View of house at 800 16th Street NW once occupied by Secretary of State John Hay (1898-1905).

Source: Dig DC

Here is another great photo, and another.

About Tom

Tom founded Ghosts of DC on January 4th, 2012 as a blog to uncover the lost and untold history of Washington, D.C. He has lived in the city for over a decade and loves exploring every corner of the District.

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  • ET

    There was a nice obituary for Mr. Hay in 1905 – starts on page one and take up most of page 6.
    http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1905-07-01/ed-1/seq-1/
    http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn83045462/1905-07-01/ed-1/seq-6/

  • Jay Roberts

    Love your site.

    Was wondering if you or anyone else had any photos of New Alexandria. It was a small manufacturing town that was built in the 1890s south of Hunting Creek. There was a large furniture factory, hotel, some cottage homes and the Wash-Alex-MV Electric Line made a stop there. I’m giving a talk and all I can find is sketches. Any help appreciated!

  • Not in the Neighborhood

    Yet more photos on the place – and pictures on the bits that are left:
    https://washingtonembassygardens.wordpress.com/2015/01/31/henry-adams-and-lady-lindsay/

  • Jim McLaughlin

    There is a reason it is called “The Hay-Adams” Hotel. In the picture, the house with the two stone arches, adjoining the Hay House, is the house of writer, historian, great-grandson of John Adams, and grandson of John Quincy Adams, Henry Adams. The two houses were designed by architect H.H. Richardson and built at the same time. The Adams lived in their new home for only about a year when his wife, Mrs. Marian Hooper “Clover” Adams, committed suicide in December 1885 at the age of 42. She and Henry Adams are buried in historic Rock Creek Cemetery in Washington D.C. Their gravesite is adorned by a large bronze statue commisioned by Henry Adams in memory of his wife and created by sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens. The gravesite is frequently visited by tourists and others interested in the history involved. I have been there myself.