Quaint Old Southworth Cottage at 36th and Prospect in Georgetown

E.D.E.N. Southworth
E.D.E.N. Southworth
Another great find courtesy of Dig DC and the DC Public Library.This is the Southworth Cottage at 36th and Prospect in Georgetown, home of noted author Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth, taken in 1909. She was a contemporary and friend of Harriet Beecher Stowe, as well as a supporter of women’s rights.Below is her obituary which we came across in The New York Times, printed July 1st, 1899.
WASHINGTON, June 30.–Mrs. E.D.E.N. Southworth, the novelist, died at her residence in this city, at 8:30 o’clock tonight.Mrs. Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth, more commonly known by the word formed by her initials, which was taken by her as a name–“Eden” Southworth–was the most voluminous producer of fiction in the literary history of this country, having been the author of more than sixty novels and stories….Mrs. Southworth began the production of stories while she was a teacher in the public schools of Washington. At that time hse had to support herself and her two children and undertook to add something to her small salary as teacher. She began by contributing short stories to The Visitor, a paper published in Baltimore by Dr. Snodgrass. This was as early as 1843 …In 1840 she married Frederick H. Southworth of Utica, N. Y. She settled in a villa on the Potomac Heights, Washington, in 1853, where she lived until 1876 when she removed for a time to Yonkers, in this State. For some time before her death she ad lived in Prospect Cottage, Georgetown, near Washington. It overlooked the Potomac, to which her birth on its banks and her long associations had firmy [sic] attached her

Sadly, the house was razed in 1942. Also note that the cottage sits at the top of the Exorcist Stairs.

View of the east and south elevations of Mrs. E. D. E. N (Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte) Southworth's cottage, located at the southwest corner of Prospect and 36th Streets NW. In background can be seen 1224 36th Street NW whose Prospect Street elevation is painted with "Drink Coca-Cola."
View of the east and south elevations of Mrs. E. D. E. N (Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte) Southworth’s cottage, located at the southwest corner of Prospect and 36th Streets NW. In background can be seen 1224 36th Street NW whose Prospect Street elevation is painted with “Drink Coca-Cola.”
Source: Dig DCHere’s our favorite photo of the old cottage after it was no longer a residence.
- click image for more -
Prospect Cottage once stood on the southwest corner of 36th and Prospect Streets, NW, in Georgetown. The house was torn down in 1942.
Prospect Cottage once stood on the southwest corner of 36th and Prospect Streets, NW, in Georgetown. The house was torn down in 1942.
Source: Streets of Washington FlickrBelow is another photo of the cottage, courtesy of the DC Public Library’s Flickr page.
E.D.E.N. Southworth house in Georgetown. Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth wrote more than 60 novels in the latter part of the 19th century and was one of the most widely read authors of that era
E.D.E.N. Southworth house in Georgetown. Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth wrote more than 60 novels in the latter part of the 19th century and was one of the most widely read authors of that era
And another one from Dig DC.
Southworth Cottage
Southworth Cottage
Source: Dig DC

About Tom

Tom founded Ghosts of DC on January 4th, 2012 as a blog to uncover the lost and untold history of Washington, D.C. He has lived in the city for over a decade and loves exploring every corner of the District.

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  • Publius Washingtoniensis

    Note the Coca Cola sign painted on the wall of the building across the street from Southworth Cottage, which is now home to the restaurant, “1789.” Founder Richard McCooey, who died earlier this year, bought two very tired Federal styl houses at the NW corner of 36th and Prospect Streets, NW, gutted them — new steel framing, plumbing, wiring, HVAC, floor plans, etc. — and created “1789” and “The Tombs” in the early 1960s.

  • Angelo Maggi

    Actually those were not houses that stood on the corner of 36th and Prospect where McCooey established the 1789. The corner building was a Chinese laundry run by the Lees and the next building was the Hilltop Inn (a bar popular with Georgetown students). Next door was Tehaan’s and next to that was my father’s barbershop and our house that my family owned from 1925 until 1972 when the university purchased it. I don’t think McCooey owned the 1789 and Tombs but rather leased it from GU.