Washington, DC history

The lost and untold history of Washington, DC.

Washington Nationals 1912

Oh, You Nationals! Keep It Up, Boys!

What a fun old print from The Washington Times printed on June 18th, 1912.

door frame within mill

Visit the Ruins of Seneca Quarry (Yes, Real Ruins!)

If you’ve read GoDCer Garrett Peck’s book, then you’re familiar with Seneca Quarry and the important role it played in the building growth of our area. I knew it was a pretty cool spot to visit, but...

Women marchers organized by country, state, occupation, and organization, led by Miss Inez Milholland and Mrs. Richard Coke Burleson, during the suffrage march, March 3, 1913, Washington, D.C.

Drawing of Suffrage March Line (1913)

Here’s an interesting drawing that we dug up. It shows the suffrage march line from March 4th, 1913. Source: Library of Congress

Great Map of Takoma Park in 1907

Look how amazing this old map is. You can see the outlines of proposed roads in and around Takoma. Source: Library of Congress

Chevy Chase ad in 1922

Chevy Chase Terrace: Washington’s Most Exclusive Residential Park

Above is an advertisement from The Washington Herald from October 21st, 1922 showing Chevy Chase.

Heroic Men Save Family From Runaway Horse and Carriage

Here’s a wild story from The Washington Post, printed on April 21st, 1913. Two unidentified men risked their lives yesterday afternoon in stopping a runaway horse attached to a surrey containing four persons in G, near Sixth...

Swampoodle Houses

Irish Thief and Family Arrested in Swampoodle for Assaulting Officers

This is a colorful story for the lost neighborhood of Swampoodle. We came across the article in The Washington Post, printed on October 20th, 1879. Morris Connors, a notorious Swampoodle thief and rough, tumbled out of a...

Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, DC Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, DC

Constitution Avenue Almost Renamed Franklin or L’Enfant Avenue

We wrote a while ago about the history behind Constitution Avenue. Doing a little more digging, we have come up with a great addendum to that post, with a little more backstory on the second-place names....

Did You Vote? Your Morning Links

Did you vote? We need you to decide on the next If Walls Could Talk post, so make sure you help us out. Homelessness: Can we end chronic homelessness in D.C. by 2017? That’s what the goal...

Knickerbocker Theater disaster

Footage of 1922 Knickerbocker Theatre Disaster Aftermath

Many of you will be familiar with these images from the Knickerbocker Theater disaster. We haven’t yet written about it, but there’s an excellent write-up on it at here and at Greater Greater Washington.

John W. Ross Elementary School

Why Is It Named Ross Elementary School?

Who was John W. Ross? He has a nice little school named for him in Dupont Circle at 1730 R St. NW. It’s pre-K through fifth grade and has only 154 students. Maybe some of you...

Vince Lombardi

The Day Vince Lombardi Died

Happened to catch that Vince Lombardi special the other day on HBO. They always manage to show it in the run-up to the Super Bowl. It brought home again the total shock of learning shortly before...

Phoebe Hearst Elementary School

Why Is It Named Hearst Elementary School?

Hearst Elementary School up in North Cleveland Park, behind Sidwell Friends, is a cute little school for about 200 students. We’ve wanted to do a post on a local public school for a while and were...

1873 Inauguration of Ulysses S. Grant

1873 View of Ulysses Grant’s Second Inauguration

Here’s an old print from 1873, showing Ulysses Grant’s second inauguration, looking down Pennsylvania Ave. Source: Library of Congress

corporal punishment

Corporal Punishment Banned in D.C. Schools

Here’s an interesting article that we dug up from April 17th, 1930, printed in The Washington Post. Emphatic condemnation of any form of corporal punishment of a child by a teacher in the District schools was voiced yesterday...

Aftermath of the McCrory disaster, a virtually forgotten chapter in the history of Washington, D.C.: At 1:32 p.m. on Nov. 21, 1929, a boiler in the basement of the McCrory five-and-dime store at 416 Seventh Street NW exploded, demolishing the ground floor and igniting a fire in a deafening blast whose final toll was six dead and dozens injured. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative.

Horrific Explosion on 7th Street Kills Six

Study this photograph carefully. Look at the complete destruction of the building. This was the McCrory five-and-dime store at 416 7th St. NW just after it exploded in the afternoon of November 21st, 1929. The blast...

Punxsutawney Phil

WTF Rain, Go Away: Morning Links

This weather sucks … cold and wet. Go ahead and stay in bed, because you don’t want to go outside. Here are you morning links. Winter freeze to continue: Punxsutawney Phil, the groundhog that dictates the...

1925 Washington Senators

Great Film Footage of 1925 World Series

Here’s a cool find from YouTube. The Senators lost the World Series to the Pirates, after having won the year before. Can you tell Ghosts of DC is getting excited for the 2014 baseball season?