Where Did President Grover Cleveland’s Cabinet Live?

Now this is a unique post for you. We came across a fascinating directory from the 53rd Congress (i.e., from 1893 to 1895 during Grover Cleveland’s second term in the White House). We wanted to do a little digging to see where the members of his cabinet lived and then map that on a Google Map. Check out what we came up with.

For those of you who haven’t memorized the names of President Cleveland’s second cabinet, they are listed below.

Secretary of State: Walter Q. Gresham

Secretary of the Treasury: John G. Carlisle

Secretary of War: Daniel S. Lamont

Attorney General: Richard Olney

Postmaster General: Wilson S. Bissell

Secretary of the Navy: Hilary A. Herbert

Secretary of the Interior: M. Hoke Smith

Secretary of Agriculture: J. Sterling Morton

Click on this interesting map to see who lived where. It’s interesting to see how close everyone lived to each other. Washington was a really different time back then, when leaders in all branches of government lived close to each other in D.C. and socialized outside of work.

Below is a photo of Cleveland’s last cabinet, which includes some of the members above. This was his cabinet his last year in office.

- click image for more -
Grover Cleveland's last cabinet - Front row, left to right: Daniel S. Lamont, Richard Olney, Cleveland,John G. Carlisle, Judson Harmon Back row, left to right: David R. Francis, William L. Wilson, Hilary A. Herbert, Julius S. Morton
Grover Cleveland’s last cabinet – Front row, left to right: Daniel S. Lamont, Richard Olney, Cleveland,John G. Carlisle, Judson Harmon Back row, left to right: David R. Francis, William L. Wilson, Hilary A. Herbert, Julius S. Morton

Oh, by the way, if you haven’t read this piece on why it’s named Cleveland Park, you should check that out.

About Tom

Tom founded Ghosts of DC on January 4th, 2012 as a blog to uncover the lost and untold history of Washington, D.C. He has lived in the city for over a decade and loves exploring every corner of the District.

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  • Kathleen

    This was so interesting! Thanks for sharing. I wonder how many of their houses still stand…probably not too many, given all the office buildings now. I also love the photo – and the fact that mustaches apparently were part of every man’s “uniform” in those days.