Incredible Aerial View of State, War and Navy Building From Washington Monument in 1911

How amazing is this beautiful photo from 1911? Click on it for a much larger, detailed version.

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Circa 1911, landmarks include, from left, Memorial Continental Hall (headquarters of the Daughters of the American Revolution); the Corcoran Gallery of Art; State, War and Navy Building; and White House West Wingtip. 8x10 inch glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company.
Circa 1911, landmarks include, from left, Memorial Continental Hall (headquarters of the Daughters of the American Revolution); the Corcoran Gallery of Art; State, War and Navy Building; and White House West Wingtip. 8×10 inch glass negative, Detroit Publishing Company.

Source: Shorpy

About Tom

Tom founded Ghosts of DC on January 4th, 2012 as a blog to uncover the lost and untold history of Washington, D.C. He has lived in the city for over a decade and loves exploring every corner of the District.

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  • tassojunior

    White House not in photo. Just part of the west wing.

  • capsfan333

    It’s interesting to see the DAR Memorial Continental Hall before Constitution Hall & the building between were added. I always figured they were built at the same time.

  • Paul Wahler

    I was curious about the structure across 17th from the Corcoran, so I zoomed in on it. I am guessing it is a stable from the look of it, although at the end of the horse era. But then I noticed the number of people all in white shirts north of that building and south of State, War and Navy. I believe they are playing a little pick-up game of baseball. What do you think?

  • Publius Washingtoniensis

    For Paul Wahler: Yes, the elegant little building with the Mansard roof across from the Corcoran was the White House Mews, or stables. It was demolished during the 20s, I think, after the presidential coaches and horses were retired for Packards and Pierce Arrows. In the UK, the Royal family kept all its carriages and old cars, some of which is always on display at the Royal Mews. I wonder what became of the presidential horse-powered rolling stock.

  • ET

    This picture just reminds you how undeveloped DC was. That area is nothing but office buildings now. Back then you are seeing a lot of residences interspersed with nothing.