Drawings of Proposed I-95 Through D.C.

Here are some terrific old maps from 1971 showing the remainder of what would have been I-95 cutting through D.C. Today, what is now 395, ends at New York Ave. NW.

Notice the decked/tunneled section south of Fort Totten, then the over 90-degree turn to the east, then the decked/tunneled section between Galloway Street and Gallatin Street, with the Metrorail Glenmont Route (Red Line trains) following the North Central Freeway (I-95 south of Fort Totten and I-70S north of Fort Totten), and with the Metrorail Greenbelt Route (Green Line trains) following the Northeast Freeway (I-95 east of Fort Totten). The area between Galloway Street and Gallatin Street where the Northeast Freeway was proposed was mostly open fields then and still is now.
Notice the decked/tunneled section south of Fort Totten, then the over 90-degree turn to the east, then the decked/tunneled section between Galloway Street and Gallatin Street, with the Metrorail Glenmont Route (Red Line trains) following the North Central Freeway (I-95 south of Fort Totten and I-70S north of Fort Totten), and with the Metrorail Greenbelt Route (Green Line trains) following the Northeast Freeway (I-95 east of Fort Totten). The area between Galloway Street and Gallatin Street where the Northeast Freeway was proposed was mostly open fields then and still is now.
Notice the decked/tunneled section alongside the B&O Railroad (CSXT today).
Notice the decked/tunneled section alongside the B&O Railroad (CSXT today).
Notice the decked/tunneled section along New York Avenue.
Notice the decked/tunneled section along New York Avenue.

Source: Roads to the Future

About Tom

Tom founded Ghosts of DC on January 4th, 2012 as a blog to uncover the lost and untold history of Washington, D.C. He has lived in the city for over a decade and loves exploring every corner of the District.

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  • Guest

    Much info about unbuilt DC I-95 at ‘A Trip Within The Beltway’

    http://continuingcounterreformation.blogspot.com/2014/06/pope-francis-sj-puts-his-feet-down-his.html

    There were engineering studies dating back to 1960:

    http://wwwtripwithinthebeltway.blogspot.com/2006/11/1960-northeast-freeway.html

    Be sure to study the differences between the 1962 JFK vision and the 1966 Supplementary report with the 1964 planning.

  • douglasawillinger

    Much info about unbuilt DC I-95 at ‘A Trip Within The Beltway’

    There were engineering studies dating back to 1960.

    Be sure to study the differences between the 1962 JFK vision and the 1966 Supplementary report with the 1964 planning.

    http://wwwtripwithinthebeltway.blogspot.com/search?updated-min=2006-01-01T00:00:00-05:00&updated-max=2007-01-01T00:00:00-05:00&max-results=14

  • David Fielding

    The beauty of the DC street grid is that it acts as a colander filtering traffic through a system of streets with many options for moving Into and about town. City planners have recognized the importance each time a suggestion arises to add a highway into the city (as was considered along the Potomac at what became Clara Barton pkwy).

    The numbered streets go to about 81st street to the West (in Cabin John, MD). The alphabetical system is most interesting as it runs through the letters then starts over with two syllable names, then three. After 3 syllables, it continues with single syllable plant names. Locals learn the value of the diagonal state named streets. The traffic circles are brilliant. There would be no other way to accomplish the intersection of many streets. If you commute by car from Virginia, all of this is lost on you as The Northern Virginia street system is far from elegant and eventually you have to cross one of the bridges.

  • Sheila

    Does anyone remember when the Monorail system was being considered? It didn’t last long, no one seemed to take it very seriously at the time. I thought it would be a lot better than a highway, but so little was known of Monorail back then, that few really considered it. Shoot, back then, it was considered a “toy ride” by many, mostly because the only thing known about monorail was they had it at Disneyland in Fla., and few knew of them either. It’s weird to think of it today, because everyone knows what is going on all over the world, all the time, but in the early 1960’s very few knew about any of this. Believe it or not! I worked at “Ma Bell” back then, and I asked my friend what she thought of the new highway, and she didn’t know they were even considering it, and had no idea what a Monorail system was. Times, they do change.
    It’s hard to believe that I remember Washington DC as a small town, and I guess my generation is the last of those times. I sure do miss it.