Georgetown’s Copley Hall in 1931

Here is a photo of the new Copley Hall in 1931.

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The Hall was named for Thomas Copley, S.J. (ca. 1595-1652). Among its many external decorations is a large Latin inscription on its middle gable which reads: 'Moribus Antiquis Res Stat Loyolaea Virisque.' This has been translated as: 'Loyola’s Fortune Still May Hope To Thrive, If Men and Mold Like Those of Old Survive.' The south gable bears the family crest of St. Ignatius Loyola who founded the Society of Jesus, the lily of the seal of the University of Paris where he was educated, and the seal of the Society of Jesus.
The Hall was named for Thomas Copley, S.J. (ca. 1595-1652). Among its many external decorations is a large Latin inscription on its middle gable which reads: ‘Moribus Antiquis Res Stat Loyolaea Virisque.’ This has been translated as: ‘Loyola’s Fortune Still May Hope To Thrive, If Men and Mold Like Those of Old Survive.’ The south gable bears the family crest of St. Ignatius Loyola who founded the Society of Jesus, the lily of the seal of the University of Paris where he was educated, and the seal of the Society of Jesus.

Source: Georgetown University Library

About Tom

Tom founded Ghosts of DC on January 4th, 2012 as a blog to uncover the lost and untold history of Washington, D.C. He has lived in the city for over a decade and loves exploring every corner of the District.

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  • Publius Georgiopolitani

    Copley Hall and the White Gravenor Building were elements in GU President Coleman Nevils’ ambitious plan for a “Greater Georgetown.” If completed, it would have included extensions to the White Gravenor Building to the north and south, and a companion dormitory facing Copley Hall from the east. All the buildings would have been designed in “Collegiate Gothic” style and would have comprised a harmonious three-sided quadrangle facing south toward the Healy Building. The Depresssion prevented completion of the project, and even construction of the White-Gravenor Building continued only ecause Fr. Nevils refused to fire the stone masons and other construction workers in the middle of the Depression. GU Library’s special collections surely has the architect’s renderings for Greater Georgetown.