Hotel Harrington will have its 100th birthday next year in March. It’s one of the landmark D.C. buildings downtown that was spared the destruction of the redevelopment of the 1970s and 1980s. For a little twist on our “Three Things…” posts, we are going to feature three old advertisements from the hotel’s first year.

But, before we dive into the opening year advertisements, here is a great old photo of the hotel from around 1916, thanks to the Library of Congress.

Hotel Harrington in 1916
Hotel Harrington in 1916
[Click image for larger version.]

1. Opening month advertisement

Here is an advertisement from the Washington Post on April 2nd, 1914, about a month after the hotel opened.

The Hotel Harrington - April 2nd, 1914 (Washington Post)
The Hotel Harrington – April 2nd, 1914 (Washington Post)
[Click image for larger version.]

2. Christmas Day Dinner for $1.00

What a bargain! Christmas Day dinner celebration at the Hotel Harrington for a buck!

Hotel Harrington Christmas 1914 advertisement - December 20th, 1914 (Washington Herald)
Hotel Harrington Christmas 1914 advertisement – December 20th, 1914 (Washington Herald)
[Click image for larger version.]

3. Hotel Harrington – European Plan

Below is an advertisement we dug up from the Washington Times, listing all the companies involved in building and furnishing the new hotel.

Hotel Harrington advertisement - April 2nd, 1914 (Washington Times)
Hotel Harrington advertisement – April 2nd, 1914 (Washington Times)
[Click image for larger version.]
Tom founded Ghosts of DC on January 4th, 2012 as a blog to uncover the lost and untold history of Washington, D.C. He has lived in the city for over a decade and loves exploring every corner of the District.
  • punkaj04

    Great photograph. That’s the spire of the Old Post Office Building in the background. Here’s what it looks like today (apparently, they expanded down E Street at some point): http://goo.gl/maps/czHVt.

  • MikeDC

    Great stuff. My father used to eat at the Harrington every Sunday in 1939-40 when he moved to here for a job while living in boarding houses on K Street, 17th Street and around New Hampshire and P Street. According to the hotel manager today’s restaurant is the same one as in 1940. Also, the lobby and first floor walls contain old photographs of the city.